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Frequently Asked Questions
  • Health Care Flexible Spending Account (FSA)
    • *Note: This information is general in nature for informational purposes only. Please refer to your employer’s plan for specific information about your plan.
      Do I have to enroll in my employer’s medical or dental plan to participate in the health care FSA?
      Your plan will determine this. Although your employer can require that you take the medical or dental plan in order to have a health care FSA, not all plans are designed this way. You should check your plan documents to confirm this. 
       
      I have a health care FSA. If I’m contributing throughout the year, how much will my FSA cover for a claim in the beginning of the year?
      With a health care FSA, your full election amount is available on the first day of the plan year. This means that you can use your entire election on day one of the plan year.
       
      Example: You elect to contribute $1,200 for the plan year. In January, you have contributed $100. ($100 x 12 months = $1,200) In that same month, you receive health care services that cost you $1,000. At this point, you haven’t submitted any other claims. This means, you’ll receive the full amount of the claim from your FSA. You don’t have to wait until you actually contribute this amount to your health care FSA.
       
      What expenses are eligible under a health care FSA? 
      Generally, expenses that are medically necessary are considered eligible. This means if you need the service or product for your health it may be an eligible expense. This includes co-payments, co-insurance and deductibles. You can view a list of common eligible expenses on this website. You can also find more information at www.irs.gov. Refer to IRS Publications 969 and 502. You should also check your plan documents for eligible expenses under your plan.
       
      Can I use my FSA to pay for over-the-counter (OTC) items, supplies, drugs and medicines?
      Yes. However, there are different rules on how you can use your FSA to pay OTC items, supplies, drugs and medicines. You can use your PayFlex Card® to pay for OTC items and supplies. These include items such as bandages, hot/cold packs, thermometers, first aid kits, home diagnostic tests and diabetic supplies. You can also pay for these items out of pocket and then submit a claim to us. 
       
      For OTC drugs and medicines, you can’t use your PayFlex Card. First, you’ll need a written prescription from your doctor. Then you’ll have to pay for the OTC drug or medicine out of pocket and then submit a claim to us. You’ll need to include your written prescription and the detailed receipt with your claim.
       
      May I submit eligible health care expenses incurred by my spouse and dependents?
      Yes. You can be reimbursed for eligible health care expenses that you, your spouse and eligible tax dependents incur during the plan year. This is true even if you don’t cover your spouse and dependents on your health plan.
       
      Why do I have to show that an expense was medically necessary?
      There are some products or services that aren’t always used for medical care. Some products may be used for general health reasons. Two examples are massage therapy and weight loss programs. If you use the product or service to treat a medical condition, you’ll need to show that. This is “evidence of medical necessity.” You can submit a prescription or letter from your health care provider. You can also have your health care provider complete and sign a Letter of Medical Necessity form. You can find this form in the Resource Center.
       
      Can I pay my spouse’s health insurance premiums through my health care FSA?
      No. Premiums aren’t an eligible expense for the health care FSA. You can view a list of common eligible expenses on this website. For more information, visit www.irs.gov. There you can view IRS Publications 969 and 502.
  • My PayFlex Card®
    • Note: This information is general in nature for informational purposes only. Please refer to your employer’s plan for specific information about your plan.

      What is a PayFlex Card?
      Your PayFlex Card is a debit card. You can use this card to pay for health care products and services. This includes doctor and dentist visits, hospital stays, prescriptions and hearing and vision care. You may also use your card at some discount and grocery stores. These stores must have a system that can process a health care card. Note: The merchants and providers must accept MasterCard® in order for your card to work.

      What are the benefits of using a PayFlex Card?
      There are four key benefits to the PayFlex Card.
      1. Immediate payment from your account – You can use your card at the point of service.
      2. Increased personal cash flow – When you use your card you do not have to pay out of pocket.
      3. Reduced claim filing – You won’t have to submit a claim and wait for reimbursement. Note: Be sure to keep all of your itemized receipts. You may be requested to submit them.
      4. Ease of use – Using your card allows you easy access to your funds.

      How does my PayFlex Card work for health care expenses?
      You can use your PayFlex Card to pay for an eligible expense. Swipe your card. Select “Credit.” (Though this is a debit card, you will not select “Debit.”) Your transaction will process like any other credit or debit card purchase. Note: The merchants and providers must accept MasterCard® for your card to work. They also must be a health care location (such as a doctor’s office or pharmacy). If they are not a health care location, they must have a system that can process a Health Care card. If you purchase eligible and non-eligible items, you can only use your card to pay for the eligible items. You will have to use another form of payment for the non-eligible items.

      When you first receive your card, it is good for five years. Note for FSA: Each year that you enroll, the card will house the FSA plan year election amount. You can only use the card for expenses that you incur during that plan year. This includes a grace period if your employer offers one on the FSA. You should always keep all of your itemized receipts to substantiate card transactions.

      Should I select “debit” or “credit” when using my PayFlex Card?
      You can use your card as "credit" or "debit."  When you choose "debit", you will need to enter a Personal Identification Number (PIN). To create a PIN, please call 1-888-999-0121.

      I just received my PayFlex Card. Do I have to use the card for all of my health care expenses?
      No. You do not need to use your card for all health care expenses. You can always use another form of payment for your expenses and submit a claim for reimbursement.

      Where can I use my PayFlex Card?
      You can use your card to pay for eligible health care products and services. This includes doctor and dentist visits, hospital stays, prescriptions and hearing and vision care. You may also use your card at some discount and grocery stores. These stores must have a system that can process a Health Care card. Note: The merchants and providers must accept MasterCard® for your card to work.

      What should I do if my PayFlex Card is not accepted?
      There is more than one reason why you may not be able to use your card.

      • Some providers do not accept debit or credit cards.
      • A merchant or provider may not accept MasterCard®.
      • The merchant may not be able to accept health care cards.
      • Your account balance may not cover the expense.
      • Your account may be suspended. When your account is suspended we need more information regarding another card transaction.

      If you are unable to use your card, you will have to use another form of payment. If your plan allows, you can then file a claim for reimbursement.

      Can I buy over-the-counter (OTC) items with the card?
      You can use your funds to pay for OTC items and supplies. These are items such as bandages or a home diagnostic test. You can also use the funds to pay for diabetic supplies and equipment such as crutches. However, the rules are different for OTC medicines. To use your funds for OTC medicines, you need a written prescription. A standard list of eligible expenses is available online. After logging in, go to My Resources. Click on Planning Tools.

      Can I use my PayFlex Card to purchase eligible items online?
      Yes. You can use your card for online purchases of eligible items. Please remember to keep any and all receipts.

      Do I also need to submit a claim form when I use my PayFlex Card?
      If you used your card, please do not submit a claim. However, there may be times when we need more information about the card transaction. We may need you to show documentation that an expense was for qualified medical care. Refer to “What should I do if my account is in overpayment status?”.

      How do I access my account information online?
      After logging in, from My Dashboard, select Financial Center from the top navigation bar. Then use the drop down menu to select which account you want to view. You can see account information and card transactions.

      Why did I receive a Request for Documentation letter?
      You recently used your PayFlex Card. You received a letter because we need more information on that card transaction. We need proof that the expense was for qualified medical care. The amount you paid may not match your copay amount. The amount you paid may have been for an estimated amount. We need to know how much you were supposed to pay out of pocket for the claim. Note: If you received this letter, your account may be suspended, if you do not respond by the date indicated. While your account is suspended, you cannot use your card for that account. However, you may request reimbursement by submitting a completed claim.

      You can send one of the following items for the transaction in question.

      • The best form of proof is the Explanation of Benefits (EOB). You will receive this for any claim that first goes through your medical or dental plan.
      • If this is not for a claim that went through your medical plan (for example, an OTC expense), you can use an itemized receipt. The receipt must show the date of purchase or service; the amount you paid; a description of the item or service; and the name of the merchant or provider. Note: If the claim is for an OTC medicine, you must also include a written prescription from your health care provider.
      • If you are sending a prescription drug receipt, it must contain the pharmacy name; patient name; date of the prescription; and amount you paid.

      Please provide this information as soon as possible. You can upload the documentation online. If you are not able to do this, you can mail or fax it to us. The Request for Documentation letter gives you the instructions for getting that to us. Once we confirm that the amount you paid is an eligible expense, we will re-activate your card.

      Note: A cancelled check or credit card receipt alone is not acceptable documentation.

      What is an Inventory Information Approval System (IIAS)?
      An Inventory Information Approval System (IIAS) is a system that marks a product or service as an eligible health care expense. Stores that sell eligible and non-eligible items must have an IIAS to accept health care cards. These include drug stores, discount stores and grocery stores. These types of stores sell more than just health care items. For example, a drug store also sells newspapers, food items and cosmetics. When you purchase a number of items, the IIAS marks the items that you can pay for with your PayFlex Card. You would then pay for the other items with another form of payment.

      What should I do if a store does not have an Inventory Information Approval System (IIAS)?
      If the store does not have an IIAS, you can still make your purchase. You will have to use another form of payment. You can then submit a claim for reimbursement.

      What happens if I do not have enough money in my account to pay for an expense?
      If you do not have enough funds in your account, you PayFlex Card will be denied. You could ask the merchant to charge your card just for the amount that you have available. Then you would pay the balance with another form of payment. Depending on the type of account, you may or may not be able to submit a claim for reimbursement.

      • HSA – Once you contribute more funds to your account, you can submit a claim for reimbursement.
      • Health Care FSA – With a Health Care FSA, the full amount of your annual election was available on the first day of the plan year. Even though you may still be contributing to the FSA, you will not be able to submit a claim for reimbursement.

      What should I do if my card is lost or stolen?
      Contact us as soon as possible to report a lost or stolen card to help limit any potential loss or liability as outlined in your cardholder agreement. We can then cancel your card and send you a new one.

      If you’re still worried about identity theft after cancelling your card, you can use MasterCard’s Identity Theft Resolution Services at no cost. They can assist you with the process of restoring your identity. Identity Theft Resolution Services include:

      • 24/7 access to MasterCard’s certified resolution specialists
      • Internet monitoring to proactively detect stolen personally identifiable information and compromised confidential data online
      • Assistance from a specialist with notification to all three major credit reporting agencies to place blocks on cardholders’ records and obtain free credit reports
      • Assistance with completing paperwork to alert various parties of the potential fraud
      • Education about how identity theft can occur and protective measures to avoid further occurrences
      To learn more about the Identity Theft Resolution Services, call the MasterCard Assistance Center at 1-800-MC-ASSIST (1-800-622-7747).

      MasterCard® is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated.
    • Note:  This information is general in nature for informational purposes only.  Please refer to your employer’s plan for specific information about your plan.
      What is a PayFlex Card?
      Your PayFlex Card is a debit card. You can use this card to pay for health care products and services. This includes doctor and dentist visits, hospital stays, prescriptions and hearing and vision care. You may also use your card at some discount and grocery stores. These stores must have a system that can process a health care card. Note: The merchants and providers must accept MasterCard® in order for your card to work.

      What are the benefits of using a PayFlex Card?
      There are four key benefits to the PayFlex Card. 
      1. Immediate payment from your account – You can use your card at the point of service.
      2. Increased personal cash flow – When you use your card you do not have to pay out of pocket. 
      3. Ease of use – Using your card allows you easy access to your funds.
      How does my PayFlex Card work for health care expenses?                                 
      You can use your PayFlex Card to pay for an eligible expense. Swipe your card.  Select “credit” or “debit.” Your transaction will process like any other credit or debit card purchase. Note: The merchants and providers must accept MasterCard® for your card to work. They also must be a health care location (such as a doctor’s office or pharmacy). If they are not a health care location, they must have a system that can process a health care card. If you purchase eligible and non-eligible items, you can only use your card to pay for the eligible items. You will have to use another form of payment for the non-eligible items.    
      When you first receive your card, it is good for five years.

      Should I select “debit” or “credit” when using my PayFlex Card?                       
      You can use your  card as "credit" or "debit."  When you choose "debit", you will need to enter a Personal Identification Number (PIN). To create a PIN, please call 1-888-999-0121.

      I just received my PayFlex Card. Do I have to use the card for all of my health care expenses?
      No. You do not need to use your card for all health care expenses. You can always use another form of payment for your expenses and submit a claim for reimbursement.

      Where can I use my PayFlex Card?
      You can use your card to pay for eligible health care products and services. This includes doctor and dentist visits, hospital stays, prescriptions and hearing and vision care. You may also use your card at some discount and grocery stores. These stores must have a system that can process a health care card. Note: The merchants and providers must accept MasterCard® for your card to work.   

      What should I do if my PayFlex Card is not accepted?
      There is more than one reason why you may not be able to use your card. 
      • Some providers do not accept debit or credit cards.
      • A merchant or provider may not accept MasterCard®.
      • The merchant may not be able to accept health care cards.
      • Your account balance may not cover the expense.
      If you are unable to use your card, you will have to use another form of payment. You can then pay yourself back using your HSA.

      Can I buy over-the-counter (OTC) items with the card?
      You can use your funds to pay for OTC items and supplies.  These are items such as bandages or a home diagnostic test. You can also use the funds to pay for diabetic supplies and equipment such as crutches.  However, the rules are different for OTC medicines. To use your funds for OTC medicines, you need a written prescription.   A standard list of eligible expenses is available online.  After logging in, go to My Resources. Click on Planning Tools.

      Can I use my PayFlex Card to purchase eligible items online?
      Yes. You can use your card for online purchases of eligible items. Please remember to keep any and all receipts. 

      Do I also need to submit a claim form when I use my PayFlex Card?
      If you used your card, please do not submit a claim. However, there may be times when we need more information about the card transaction. We may need you to show documentation that an expense was for qualified medical care. Refer to “What should I do if my account is in overpayment status?”.

      How do I access my account information online?
      After logging in, from My Dashboard, select Financial Center from the top navigation bar. Then use the drop down menu to select which account you want to view. You can see account information and card transactions.
       
      What is an Inventory Information Approval System (IIAS)?
      An Inventory Information Approval System (IIAS) is a system that marks a product or service as an eligible health care expense. Stores that sell eligible and non-eligible items must have an IIAS to accept health care cards. These include drug stores, discount stores and grocery stores. These types of stores sell more than just health care items. For example, a drug store also sells newspapers, food items and cosmetics. When you purchase a number of items, the IIAS marks the items that you can pay for with your PayFlex Card. You would then pay for the other items with another form of payment.  
       
      What should I do if a store does not have an Inventory Information Approval System (IIAS)?
      If the store does not have an IIAS, you can still make your purchase. You will have to use another form of payment. You can then submit a claim for reimbursement.

      What happens if I do not have enough money in my account to pay for an expense?
      If you do not have enough funds in your account, you PayFlex Card will be denied. You could ask the merchant to charge your card just for the amount that you have available. Then you would pay the balance with another form of payment.
       
      What should I do if my card is lost or stolen?                                                     
      Contact us as soon as possible to report a lost or stolen card to help limit any potential loss or liability as outlined in your cardholder agreement.  We can then cancel your card and send you a new one. 
       
      If you’re still worried about identity theft after cancelling your card, you can use MasterCard’s Identity Theft Resolution Services at no cost.  They can assist you with the process of restoring your identity.  Identity Theft Resolution Services include:  
      • 24/7 access to MasterCard’s certified resolution specialists
      • Internet monitoring to proactively detect stolen personally identifiable information and compromised confidential data online 
      • Assistance from a specialist with notification to all three major credit reporting agencies to place blocks on cardholders’ records and obtain free credit reports
      • Assistance with completing paperwork to alert various parties of the potential fraud
      • Education about how identity theft can occur and protective measures to avoid further occurrences
      To learn more about the Identity Theft Resolution Services, call the MasterCard Assistance Center at 1-800-MC-ASSIST (1-800-622-7747).
       
      MasterCard® is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. 

      Activating Your PayFlex Card®                                                                                      
      If you receive a PayFlex Card® with an activation label, this means you must activate your card before you can use it. 
       
      How do I activate my new card?
      If you receive a new card with an activation label, call Card Services at 1-877-261-9951.  This is the same number you will see on the card activation label.  Then enter your card number followed by the # sign.  You will then enter the last four digits of your Social Security number (SSN).  If your SSN is not accepted, you may need to enter the last four digits of your Employee ID number.  Once you finish these steps, your card will be activated.  You can then use your card right away.   
       
      When can I call to activate my card?
      You can call to activate your card as soon as you receive it.  Remember, you only have to activate your card if it has an activation label on it.  To activate your card, call 1-877-261-9951.  This is the same number you will see on the card activation label.  You can call this number at any time.
       
      After I activate my card, when can I start using it to pay for eligible expenses?
      You can use your card as soon as you activate it.  Note: You must have funds in your account to use the card.  You can view your account balance online on My Dashboard, under Financial Center – My Accounts.
       
      I previously received a card and didn’t have to activate it.  Why do I need to activate my new card?
      Before May 1, 2013, all PayFlex Cards were pre-activated.  That means that you didn’t have to activate your card before using it.  We have changed the activation process to place more security on your card and to decrease the fraud risk.  If your card has an activation label, you must call 1-877-261-9951.  You will have to activate the card before you can use it. 
       
      If I activate my card and then order a card for my spouse or dependent, do they need to activate their new card?
      No.  If your card is already active, your spouse or dependent does not need to activate their new card. This means your spouse or dependent should be able to use their card as soon as they receive it.  Note:  If the card is already active, it will not have an activation label on it.  If someone tries to activate an active card, they’ll hear this message:  “Our records indicate this account has already been activated. Please contact the customer service phone number on the back of your card if you need further assistance.” 
       
      I already have a card and did not have to activate it.  If I order a card for my spouse or dependent, do they need to activate their new card?
      No.  Your spouse or dependent does not need to activate their new card. Your spouse or dependent should be able to use the card immediately, as long as funds are available in your account.  Note: Activation is not required if the card does not have an activation label on it.
       
      If I receive a replacement card, do I need to activate it?
      Yes.  If you receive a new card with an activation label, you must activate the card before you can use it.  To activate the card, call 1-877-261-9951.  This is the same number you will see on the card activation label.  You’ll get a replacement card when your current card expires or if you report your card as lost or stolen.
       
      If I’m unsuccessful in activating my card, how many attempts can I make in a day? 
      You should not have a problem activating your card.  However, you can make two attempts to activate your card each day.  If you’re unable to activate your card after the second try, you must wait until the next day to try again. 
       
      What should I do if I have trouble activating my card or if I have more questions?
      Please call Member Services.  The number is on the back of your PayFlex Card. 

      Personal Identification Number (PIN) for your PayFlex Card®                             

      How do I get a PIN for my PayFlex Card®?
      Call Card Services at 1-888-999-0121. You will be asked to enter your card number, the three-digit security code (located on the back of your card) and your five-digit zip code.  Then you must enter a new four-digit PINThis means you need to create your own PIN.  To do this, enter four digits of your choice.  To confirm your PIN, re-enter your four digits.  Once you create your PIN, you can use it right away. 

      Note: Please make sure to remember your PIN, as you will not receive a confirmation of your PIN. 
       
      When will I have to use a PIN for my card transactions?
      You will use your PIN if you select “debit” at the time of purchase.  Some merchants may ask you to use your card as “debit”.  This means you will need a PIN to complete the transaction.  Please note that you are not required to select “debit”; you can still use your card as “credit.”
       
      Why do I need a PIN now? 
      Some merchants may now ask you to use your card as “debit”.  When you use your card as “debit,” you need a PIN to complete the transaction.  Also, having a PIN decreases the risk of fraudulent use of your card if it is lost or stolen.  Please note that you are not required to select “debit”; you can still use your card as “credit.”
       
      How do I know when a PIN is required? 
      When you swipe your card, you will be prompted if a PIN is required.  Please note that if you do not yet have a PIN, you can still use your card as “credit.” 
       
      When using the card, should I select “debit” or “credit”?
      If the merchant allows you to select “debit” or “credit”; either option will work.  This means you may choose “credit” and sign the receipt.  If you select “debit,” you will have to enter your PIN.  
       
      What if I forget my PIN?
      You can call 1-888-999-0121 to create a new PIN at any time.
       
      Will my spouse or dependents need a different PIN for their debit card?
      No.  There is one PIN per cardholder account.  Please make sure that any family member that has a separate debit card knows your PIN.
       
      What happens if I order a new card for one of my dependents and he or she calls to create a PIN?
      If your dependent calls to create a PIN, this new PIN will be the PIN for all cards on your account.If you had already set up a PIN, that PIN will not work anymore.When anyone creates a new PIN, it will override the PIN previously created.
       
      What happens if I do not have a PIN and the merchant requires that I use one?
      If you are asked to use a PIN, you can create one by calling Card Services.  The toll-free number is 1-888-999-0121.  If you do not yet have a PIN, you can still use your card as “credit.”  If you are unable to use your card as “credit,” you can pay for the eligible expense with cash, check or personal credit card.  Then submit a claim for reimbursement.  
       
      Now that my card will have a PIN, can I withdraw funds at an ATM?
      No.  The card will not work at an ATM.
       
      Now that my card will have a PIN, can I get cash back when using the card at a merchant?
      No.  You can only use the card to pay for eligible expenses.
  • Managing My Settings
    • Note:  This information is general in nature for informational purposes only.  Please refer to your employer’s plan for specific information about your plan.
      For ParTNers for Health FAQs about the HealthSavings CDHPs click here.
    • How do I enroll in direct deposit?
      You can enroll in Direct Deposit online or with a paper form. Once you enroll, you can receive your reimbursements directly into your checking or savings account. To get started, from the top navigation select the Financial Center. Click on Enroll in Direct Deposit from the left navigation bar and follow the steps.

      To use paper enrollment, you can download the form. The form is available in the Resource Center under Administrative Forms. Complete the form. Mail it to us at the address on the form.

      How do I change my username and password?
      You can change your user name or password at any time. Go to My Dashboard. From the left navigation bar, select My Settings. Follow the instructions to make your changes.

      How do I change my e-mail address?
      You can change your e-mail at any time. Go to My Dashboard. From the left navigation bar, select My Settings. Follow the instructions to make your changes. Note: This is the e-mail address that we will use for all account communications.

      What is eNotify? How do I enroll?
      eNotify is our electronic notification service. When you enroll in eNotify you will receive alerts and updates on your account. Depending on your plan, you can choose which notifications you want to receive. These include balance reminders and claim status. To get started, go to My Dashboard. From the left navigation select My Settings. Click on Notifications / E-mail Address and follow the steps.
  • Health Savings Account (HSAs) Simplified
    • Note:  This information is general in nature for informational purposes only.  Please refer to your employer’s plan for specific information about your plan.

      For ParTNers for Health FAQs about the HealthSavings CDHPs click here.

      What is a Health Savings Account?
      A Health Savings Account (HSA) is a tax-advantaged health care account that you own. You contribute to it with tax-free or tax-deductible funds. You can then use those funds to pay for qualified medical expenses now and in the future. You can use these funds for your own expenses and for those of your spouse and dependents. This is true even if your spouse and dependents are not on you health plan. To contribute to an HSA you must have a qualified Consumer Driven Health Plan (CDHP).
       
      Each year, the IRS sets the maximum amount you can contribute to the HSA. The funds that you contribute but do not use will roll over year to year. In addition, an HSA is portable. This means that if you change employers or leave the work force, the HSA stays with you. Finally, with an HSA you do not have to submit documentation for the funds you use. However, you should keep all your receipts. These will show that you used the funds for qualified expenses. You should also keep your receipts in the event of an IRS audit.
       
      Are my HSA benefits taxable?                                                                               
      You and your employer can contribute to an HSA with tax-free or tax-deductible funds. This means you can reduce your taxable income with an HSA.
       
      Who is eligible for an HSA?                                                                                      
      You're eligible to enroll in an HSA, if you have a qualified High-Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) and no other disqualifying health coverage.

      You and your employer are eligible to contribute to an HSA, but there are a few rules:
      • You can’t have other health coverage that pays for out-of-pocket health care expenses before you meet your plan deductible.
      • You or your spouse can’t have a health care Flexible Spending Account (FSA) or Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA) in the same year.
      • You can’t have Medicare or TRICARE.
      • You can’t have used Veterans Affairs (VA) medical benefits in the prior three months. Except in cases where the hospital care or medical services were for a service-connected disability.
      • You can’t be claimed as a dependent on another person’s tax return.
       
      What is a qualified Consumer Driven Health Plan (CDHP)?                              
      An CDHP has a higher deductible than most health plans. With this type of plan, you must first pay a deductible. Once you pay the deductible, then the CDHP can pay claims. For a Health Savings Account (HSA), a qualified CDHP must meet the following criteria.
      1. Minimum Deductibles – A qualified CDHP must have minimum deductibles. If the plan has a deductible that is lower than this minimum, it is not a qualified plan for the HSA. The minimum deductible amount for a self-only plan is $1,300. For a family plan the minimum deductible is $2,600.
      2. Limit on Out-of-Pocket Expenses – A qualified CDHP limits what you pay out of pocket in the plan year. This limit includes what you would pay for deductibles, co-payments and co-insurance. Note: These limits apply to in-network services only. The limits do not include what you pay for premiums, out-of-network services, expenses that the plan does not cover or amounts that exceed lifetime limits, if applicable. The out-of-pocket maximum for a self-only plan is $6,550. For a family plan, the limit is $13,100.
      3. Preventive Care – The HealthSavings CDHP covers in network preventive care at 100% while you are still meeting your deductible.  It may also require a co-pay or co-insurance for certain preventive services. Even though the plan covers preventive care, you would still be eligible to contribute to an HSA. Preventive care includes annual health exams, routine prenatal and well-child care, child and adult immunizations, stop-smoking programs, weight-loss programs and certain screening services.
      Note: The IRS sets these benefit limits each year. They may change from year to year based on a Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA).
       
      When am I eligible for a Health Savings Account (HSA)?
      You are eligible to have a HSA if you choose the HealthSavings CDHP insurance option..  The date that you are eligible for the HSA is based on the effective date of your CDHP.   
      • If your CDHP starts on the first day of the month then you are eligible for the HSA that same day.  For example, the CDHP starts on January 1.  You are eligible for the HSA on January 1. 
      • If your CDHP starts on any day after the first day of the month, you are eligible for the HSA on the first day of the next month.  Let’s look at an example.  Your CDHP is starts on January 15.  You are eligible for the HSA on February 1.
      Once you sign up for the HSA, you must go through a Customer Identification Process (CIP).  With the CIP, we verify your name, Social Security number, address and date of birth.  If we need more information from you, that could delay the opening of your HSA.  Once your HSA opens, that is the effective date.  So, your effective date may be later than the date you are eligible.

      I have an HSA with another bank. Can I also enroll in a PayFlex HSA?
      Yes. You can have more than one HSA. The amount that you contribute to all HSAs is still limited to the annual contribution limit for the year.

      You may also close your old HSA and transfer the funds to your new HSA. You may be paying fees on your old HSA. If so, you may want to consider that in regards to having more than one HSA.

      Can I have a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) with an HSA?
      If you are contributing to an HSA, you cannot have a regular Health Care FSA. However, you can have a Limited Purpose FSA (LPFSA). Note: Your employer must offer an LPFSA for you to enroll in one. An LPFSA is “permitted” coverage for an HSA. An LPFSA can reimburse you for eligible dental and vision expenses.
       
      What other types of health coverage can I have and still be eligible for an HSA?
      You can still be eligible for an HSA if you have certain other coverage. You can have other insurance that covers the items listed below. You may also have a discount card. A discount card gives you discounts on health care services or products.
      • Coverage relating to liabilities from workers’ compensation laws, torts, or ownership or use of property (such as automobile insurance)
      • Specified disease or illness
      • A fixed amount per day (or other period) for hospitalization
      • Accidents*
      • Disability*
      • Dental care*
      • Vision care*
      • Long-term care*
      • Most Employee Assistance Program (EAP)
      * This coverage can be through insurance or some other form of coverage. 
       
      If I no longer have a qualified CDHP, can I still use my HSA to pay for health care expenses?
      Yes. When you have a qualified CDHP you can contribute to the HSA. When you no longer have the CDHP you cannot contribute to the HSA. However, you can continue to use your HSA funds to pay for out-of-pocket Health Care qualified medical expenses.

      If I am no longer in a qualified Consumer Driven Health Plan, can I still make contributions to my HSA?                                                                                                                         
      No. Per IRS regulations, you must be enrolled in a qualified Consumer Driven CDHP to make contributions to an HSA.
       
      When can I start to use my HSA?
      You can start to use  your HSA once it is open and funded.  Your effective date determines which expenses you can pay with the HSA funds.  You can use your HSA funds for expenses that you incur on or after the HSA effective date.  You can’t use the HSA for expenses that you incurred before the HSA opened.
       
      Who may contribute to my HSA?                                                                                      
      Anyone can contribute to your HSA. This means that you, your spouse, your employer, a family member and any other person can contribute. Though anyone can contribute to your HSA, all of those contributions count toward your annual limit.
       
      How much can I contribute to my HSA?                                                              
      Each year, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) sets annual contribution limits for HSAs. For 2017, the limit for an individual enrolled in a self-only plan is $3,400. The contribution limit for a family enrolled in a HealthSavings CDHP is $6,750.
       
      You can contribute up to these limits while you (or your family) are enrolled in the CDHP.   You can contribute permitted amounts in a lump sum or on a scheduled contribution basis.   You can change your scheduled contribution amount at any time during the year as long as you don’t exceed the annual limit.  If you are age 55 or older, you can contribute another $1,000 per year. This is a “catch-up” contribution designed to allow additional savings for retirement health expenses.
       
      This means that the amount that you can contribute is based on a few things.
      1. Do you have self-only or family coverage? 
      2. Did you have coverage under the CDHP plan for the entire year? If not, the maximum contribution amounts may be limited or pro-rated based on the number of months you are enrolled in the plan.
      3. Are you 55 or older? 
      You might want to speak to your tax advisor.  They can help you understand how much you can contribute to your HSA.  Also, see also IRS Publication 969 at www.irs.gov.
       
      How much can I contribute if I do not have the CDHP for the entire year?     
      How much you can contribute depends on when you had the CDHP
      • If you are covered under an CDHP on December 1, then the Last-month rule applies. This means that if you are covered on December 1 you can contribute to your HSA as if you were covered under the CDHP for the entire year. However, if you make this full-year contribution you must remain covered under the CDHP throughout the all of the next calendar year.  Otherwise, you will be taxed on contributions made for the months you were not covered in the first year and will be subject to an additional 10% tax penalty. 
      Example: You have an CDHP starting on May 1, 2017. You still have the CDHP coverage on December 1, 2017. You contribute the full contribution amount for 2017. However, at some point in 2018 you are no longer covered under a CDHP.  You will have to pay income taxes on the amount for those months in 2017 that you were not actually eligible. In this example that would be for the months of January through April 2017. You would also have to pay a 10% tax penalty on that amount. 
      • If you have a CDHP for part of the year but not on December 1, then the Proration rule applies. Proration means that you can contribute just for the months that you are eligible. The amount you can contribute to your HSA is determined by dividing the annual contribution limit (e.g., In 2017; $3,400 for self-only, $6,750 for a family) by 12, and multiplying the result by the number of months you are covered under the CDHP during the year. Note: Eligibility is based on being covered under the CDHP on the first day of each month.
      Example: On January 1, 2017, you enroll in a family CDHP, but your coverage under that plan ends on April 30, 2017. The most that you can contribute for the year is $2,250 ($6,7550/12 = $562.50 x 4 months). 
       
      You may want to speak with your tax advisor. He or she can help you to figure out how much you can contribute.  
       
      How much can I contribute if I change from self-only to family coverage under my CDHP during the year?                                                                                                             
      How much you can contribute depends on the coverage that you have when you start and end the year. 
      • If you have a self-only CDHP on January 1 and a family CDHP on December 1, the last-month rule applies. With the last-month rule, you can contribute as if you were eligible for the entire year. This means that you can contribute as if you had family coverage under the CDHP all year.
      So, if you have family coverage under the CDHP on December 1 then you can contribute as if you had family coverage for the entire year.  However, if you do contribute up to the family limit for the full year you will have to maintain family coverage under the CDHP through the end of the following year.   If you do not maintain family coverage under the CDHP throughout the following year the contributions you made for the months you did not have the CDHP in the prior year are no longer tax-free.
      • If you start the year with a family CDHP but have self-only CDHP coverage by December 1, the Proration rule applies.  Proration means that the maximum contribution amount allowed will be determined based on the number of months you had family and self-only coverage.  For each month of family coverage you can contribute 1/12 of the annual family contribution limit ($6,750), and for each month you have self-only coverage you can contribute 1/12 of the annual self-only contribution limit ($3,400).  
      Example: From January 1 through July 31, 2017, you have a family coverage under an CDHP. From August 1 through December 31, 2017, you have a self-only CDHP coverage. For January through July, you can contribute $3,937.50 ($6,750/12 = $562.50 x 7 months). For August through December, you can contribute $1,416.66 ($3,400/12 = $283.33 x 5 months). In this example, you can contribute $5,354.16 ($3,937.50 + $1,416.66). 
       
      You may want to speak with your tax advisor. He or she can help you to figure out how much you can contribute.

      I have Veterans (VA) benefits. Can I contribute to an HSA?
      Generally, you can’t contribute to an HSA if you’ve used your VA benefits during the prior three months. However, if you used your VA benefits for a service-connected disability and you meet all other HSA eligibility requirements, you can contribute to an HSA.

      What is a “catch-up” contribution?                                                                      
      If you are enrolled in a CDHP and are age 55 or older, you can contribute another $1,000 annually to your HSA. This is a catch-up contribution. For example, you have a self-only CDHP. For 2017, the contribution limit is $3,400.  If you are 55 or older, you can contribute up to $4,400 for the year. ($3,400 + $1,000) Note: This is assuming that you are eligible for the full year. 
       
      If you have family CDHP coverage and your spouse is age 55 or older, he or she can also make a catch-up contribution of $1,000 annually. If your spouse wants to do this, he or she would have to open up his or her own HSA. Only one person can own an HSA. This means that your spouse cannot contribute his or her catch-up contribution to your HSA.
       
      Note: If you are eligible for benefits under Medicare you cannot make a contribution or catch-up contribution to an HSA.  
       
      Can I transfer funds from my IRA into my HSA?
      Yes. You can make a one-time transfer from your IRA into your HSA. You would do this as a trustee-to-trustee transfer. The transfer amount is tax-free. It also counts toward your HSA contribution limit for the year. You must stay in a qualified CDHP for 12 months after the transfer date. This is the testing period. If you do not keep CDHP coverage for the entire testing period, you will have to pay income taxes on the transfer amount. You may also have to pay a 10% penalty tax. If you have additional questions, you should talk to your tax advisor.
       
      When is the deadline for making contributions to an HSA?
      For any year that you have an HSA, you can contribute up to the tax filing deadline. If you make a prior year contribution between January 1 and the tax filing deadline, please make sure you tell us that by indicating that it is a prior year contribution on both the contribution form and your check. If you do not let us know, we will post the contribution for the current year.
       
      Contributions can be made by either check or online through your HSA account.  You are able to setup a one-time or recurring contribution to your HSA from a linked bank account.  You may also make one-time contributions via check with the appropriate contribution form.
       
      How can I keep track of my balance?
      You can view your account balance online. After logging in, go to on My Dashboard. If you want more detailed information, click on View My Account.
       
      Will I receive a statement of my account activity?                                              
      You can choose how to receive statements for your account activity. You may receive them online or via US Mail. Note: There may be a fee for paper statements.  For a listing of fees, please refer to the Fee Schedule located on the left hand navigation within the Financial Center.
       
      What happens if I contribute more than the allowable annual amount?
      The amount that you can contribute to your HSA each year is based on a number of factors. These include your level of CDHP coverage, how long you had the CDHP and your age. If you (or anyone else) contribute more than that amount, you have an “excess contribution.” You should remove the excess contribution from your HSA either by requesting a withdrawal online or in writing to us using the address below.  In either case, please note that you are requesting a withdrawal that is “a return of excess contribution”. You should do this by the tax filing deadline for that year. If you do not remove the excess contribution, that amount will be subject to income taxes and a 6% penalty tax. Please talk to your tax advisor if you have more questions. 
      PayFlex Systems USA, Inc.
      P.O.Box 3317
      Carol Stream, IL 60132-3317

      What expenses can I use my HSA for?
      You can use your HSA to pay for qualified medical care as defined by IRS Publication 969. Medical care is the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment or prevention of disease, and the costs for treatments affecting any part or function of the body. This includes the cost of medical services rendered by medical practitioners, equipment, supplies and diagnostic tests. The medical care can be for you, your spouse and your dependents. This is true even if they are not on your CDHP.   
       
      You can use your HSA funds to pay for your out-of-pocket costs. To use your HSA funds, you must have received the care on or after the effective date of your HSA. For more information, please refer to IRS Publications 969 and 502.  Links to these sites are accessible within My Resources, then IRS Resources.   
       
      Do I need to keep my receipts?
      You should keep all your receipts. These will show that you used your HSA funds for qualified medical expenses. You will also need them if the IRS ever audits your tax return. 
       
      When can I receive distributions from my HSA?                                                
      Once you have funds in your HSA, you can use the funds at any time. You can keep the funds there to save for future expenses. You can use the funds to pay for expenses you now have. You can go online to make a payment to your provider or pay yourself back. If you have a PayFlex Card®, you can use it at the point of service. If you paid out of your pocket, you can go online and reimburse yourself.  After logging in, from the top navigation bar click on Financial Center. Under Health Savings Account, select Make an HSA Withdrawal. Enter all the required fields, and click Continue.
       
      If you linked your bank account, you will receive the reimbursement as a direct deposit to your personal account. This can take up to 48 hours for you to see the funds in your account. To do this, from the top navigation bar, click on Financial Center.  Select Health Savings Account from the drop down menu. Under My Account on the left hand navigation, click on Link My Bank Accounts and following the instructions.
       
      If you would prefer to receive a check, use the Make an HSA Payment feature and enter your name as the “payee”.
       
      Can I use my PayFlex Card with my HSA?
      Yes. You can use your PayFlex Card with your HSA. If you already have a PayFlex FSA Card, you will receive a PayFlex HSA Card as well.  The PayFlex Card is a MasterCard® that you can use at qualified merchants.

      What should I do if my health care provider asks for payment at the time of my visit or service?
      If you’re asked to provide payment when you visit a doctor, hospital, or lab for diagnosis or treatment of an injury or illness (non-preventive care):
      • Tell the staff at the doctor’s office, lab, hospital, or outpatient facility that under your medical plan, which is a qualified Consumer Driven Health Plan, you aren’t supposed to pay anything until you receive a statement or Explanation of Benefits (EOB) from your carrier showing the amount you owe. Note: You’ll still need to pay for prescriptions at the pharmacy if a payment is due because the discount is applied at the point of sale.
      • If the staff asks you to pay anyway, ask them to call your medical carrier to find out what you owe. Your carrier will know the actual negotiated rate that you owe. If the staff insists you pay the full, non-negotiated rate at the time of service, it’s OK to pay them. But be sure to ask for a refund for the amount you overpaid once you receive an EOB from your insurance carrier.
        • If you used your PayFlex Card® to make your original payment, the refund may be considered taxable income and subject to a 20% penalty unless you either:
          • Redeposit the refund into your HSA. You can use the HSA Contribution Coupon form which is in the Resource Center under Administrative Forms; or
          • Spend the entire refund on other HSA-eligible expenses incurred after your HSA was opened. You should save your detailed receipts, itemized statements and EOBs for these expenses to show how you used the refund in case of an IRS audit.
      How do I get reimbursed if I did not use my PayFlex Card® for a HSA expense?
      You can go online to request a reimbursement.  After logging in, from the top navigation bar click on Financial Center. Under Health Savings Account, select Make an HSA Withdrawal. Enter all the required fields, and click Continue.
       
      If you linked your bank account, you will receive the reimbursement as a direct deposit to your personal account. This can take up to 48 hours for you to see the funds in your account.  After logging in, from the top navigation bar, click on Financial Center.  Select Health Savings Account from the drop down menu.  Under My Account on the left hand navigation, click on Link My Bank Accounts and following the instructions.
       
      If you would prefer to receive a check, use the Make an HSA Payment feature and enter your name as the “payee”.
       
      If I am divorced/separated from my child’s other parent, can I still use my HSA funds to pay for my child’s health care expenses?                                                                               
      If you and your former spouse were legally divorced or separated at the end of the calendar year or lived apart during the last six months of the calendar year, your child is then treated as a dependent of both you and your former spouse, even if your child’s tax exemption is claimed by your former spouse. In this situation, you could use your HSA to pay for your child’s eligible health care expenses.

      If you don’t meet the requirements above, but you claim your child as your dependent on your federal tax return, you can use your HSA to pay for your child’s eligible health care expenses.

      It’s important to note that if you use your HSA to pay for your child’s eligible health care expenses; your former spouse can’t use his or her HSA to pay for the same expenses. This is also true if your former spouse pays for your child’s eligible health care expenses, you can’t use your HSA to pay for the same expenses.

      For more information, please refer to IRS publication 969. Or consult with your tax advisor. PayFlex can’t give you tax advice.
       
      Can I name a beneficiary for my HSA?
      Yes. You can go online to name your beneficiar(ies). You may name up to four primary beneficiaries and up to four contingent beneficiaries. You most likely did this when you first registered your HSA online.  However, if you didn’t or you would like to make any changes, you can change your beneficiaries at any time online.  After logging in, click on the Financial Center, then select Health Savings Account from the “Select Account” drop down menu. In the left navigation, click on My Profile. Select Beneficiaries. Enter the required information.
       
      Will I have to pay taxes when I use my HSA funds?
      When you use your funds for qualified medical care, you do not pay taxes on that amount. If you use your HSA funds for a non-qualified expense, then you will have to pay income taxes. You may also have to pay a 20% penalty tax. There are times when the penalty tax does not apply. If you are disabled or age 65 or older at the time you use the funds, you do not have to pay the penalty.  Upon the death of the account owner, the account becomes the property of the named beneficiary.  If the beneficiary is the surviving spouse, distributions not used for qualified medical expenses are subject to ordinary income tax. If the beneficiary is a person other than the surviving spouse, the HSA ceases to be an HSA as of the date of the account holder's death, and the beneficiary is required to include in gross income the fair market value of the HSA assets as of the date of death.
       
      Who is responsible for determining whether HSA distributions are used for medical expenses?
      As the account owner, you have to make sure that you use your HSA funds for eligible medical expenses. You should keep all of your receipts. Also make sure to keep good records of your withdrawals. You should talk to your tax advisor if you have more questions. 
       
      Can I have an HSA if my spouse is enrolled in Medicare but I am not?                
      Yes, you are eligible to open and contribute to an HSA.

      Can I use my HSA to pay for my spouse’s health care expenses if he/she is enrolled in Medicare?                                                                          
      Yes, you can use your HSA to pay for eligible out-of-pocket health care expenses for you and your spouse.
       
      I became eligible for Medicare during the year; can I continue to contribute to my HSA?
      If you are eligible for Medicare benefits but didn’t enroll in Medicare, you can still contribute to your HSA.

      If you enroll in Medicare, you can no longer make contributions to your HSA beginning with the first month you are covered by Medicare. This rule applies even if you are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A coverage. In this situation, you would need to prorate the amount you are allowed to contribute for the tax year based on the number of months you’re not covered by Medicare. You may continue to use any remaining balance in your HSA for eligible health care expenses while enrolled in Medicare. Once you turn 65, you may also use your HSA funds for your Medicare premiums and your spouse’s premiums, if he/she is enrolled in Medicare. However, you can’t use your HSA funds for a Medicare supplemental policy.
       
      Are there penalties if I use my HSA when I begin receiving Medicare benefits?  
      If you use your HSA to pay for eligible health care expenses, you won’t pay taxes on those amounts. If you use your HSA for ineligible expenses, then you may have to pay income taxes and a 20% penalty tax. If you’re disabled, under the IRS definition or age 65 (or older) at the time you use the funds for ineligible expenses, you may only have to pay income taxes. You may not have to pay the 20% penalty tax.
       
      I am currently enrolled in Medicare.  Will I be eligible to enroll in a Health Savings Account (HSA)?   
      If you are currently enrolled in Medicare, you aren’t eligible to make contributions to an HSA. Under IRS rules you can’t open an HSA or make or receive contributions to an HSA if you have any other medical coverage that is not a qualified Consumer Driven Health Plan, including Medicare. This rule applies even if you are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A coverage.

      I am age 65 (or older). I have Medicare. I also still have coverage through my employer’s health plan. May I use my HSA funds to pay my contribution to my employer’s health coverage?
      The answer depends on how you pay for your employer’s health plan. If you pay those premiums with pre-tax money, then the answer is no. You cannot use your HSA funds to pay for premiums that you pay pre-tax.
       
      If you pay the premiums with after-tax money, then you can use the HSA funds for this expense. Once you reach age 65, this is an eligible expense for the HSA.
       
      I am enrolled in Medicare. Can I use my HSA funds for my Medicare premiums?
      You can use your HSA funds for most Medicare premiums. You cannot use your HSA funds for a Medicare supplemental policy. Note: This applies if you are age 65 or older.
       
      What happens to my HSA if I leave my employer or I cancel my health plan coverage?
      If you leave your employer or cancel your health plan coverage, the HSA stays with you and you may continue to use your remaining balance for eligible health care expenses. You’ll receive a letter from PayFlex about the changes to your HSA. You’ll keep the same PayFlex account and PayFlex debit card; however, you’ll have to pay a monthly maintenance fee which was previously covered by the state. This fee will be paid from your PayFlex HSA on the first of each month.

      Note: You won’t be able to contribute to your HSA unless you enroll in another qualified Consumer Driven Health Plan.

      If you want to close your HSA, you’ll need to complete the Account Closure form located in the Resource Center tab of your online account or call PayFlex to request a form. After you close your account, you can still view your account history (deposits, payments, withdrawals, etc.) on the PayFlex member website.

      What options do I have with my PayFlex HSA balance once I leave my employer or I cancel my health plan coverage?
      Option 1: Keep your HSA at PayFlex
      • You can use your remaining balance to pay for your eligible health care expenses. You can’t contribute to your HSA unless you enroll in another qualified Consumer Driven Health Plan.
      • You’ll use the same PayFlex debit card.
      • You’ll have to pay a monthly maintenance fee. This fee will be paid from your HSA on the first of each month.
      • You’ll continue to use the PayFlex member website to manage your HSA.
      Option 2: Move your HSA balance to another HSA administrator
      You may move the balance to another HSA administrator by requesting a Trustee Transfer form from your new HSA institution. Then, complete the form and send it to PayFlex.

      Option 3: Return your HSA balance to yourself and rollover to a new HSA
      • You may request to withdraw your balance from PayFlex and have the funds sent directly to you.
      • To avoid taxes and penalties by the IRS on the funds you remove, you’ll need to rollover those funds into a new HSA. This process must be completed within 60 days.
      • Only one rollover into another HSA using this process is permitted per calendar year by the IRS.
      • The funds you roll over don’t count towards the IRS maximum contribution amount.
      I would like to close my PayFlex HSA. How do I do this?                                      
      You’ll need to either complete an HSA Account Closure form located in the Resource Center tab of your online account or call PayFlex to request a form.
      • If you have a balance in your HSA when you close your account, you can request to have those funds returned to you. You must roll over those funds into another HSA within 60 calendar days to avoid taxes and penalties.
      • Or you can have PayFlex transfer your balance directly to another HSA institution by providing an HSA Trustee Transfer form to PayFlex. You’ll need to get this form from your new HSA institution.
      What happens to my HSA upon my death?
      First, your estate can use the funds to pay any unpaid medical bills you may have at the time of your death. Your beneficiary will receive the remaining HSA funds. If that is your spouse, the HSA will remain an HSA. However, it will be in your spouse’s name. Your spouse will not have to pay any taxes on these funds.
       
      If the beneficiary is not your spouse, then the funds do not stay in an HSA. Your beneficiary will receive the funds as a withdrawal from your HSA. This means that the funds will be subject to income taxes. The funds will not be subject to the 20% penalty tax. Note: If you have a spouse and the beneficiary is not your spouse, some states require your spouse’s consent for you to have that beneficiary. You should speak to an attorney or tax consultant for more information.
       
      Is my HSA FDIC-insured?                                                                                           
      Yes. When you open an HSA, the funds are in a “cash” account. This is similar to any other bank account.  Like with other bank accounts, the HSA funds are FDIC-insured. 
       
      Can I invest my HSA funds?*                                                                                         
      You first need to have a minimum balance in your HSA.  Once you have more than the required minimum balance in your HSA, you can invest any amount over that minimum balance.  You can find this minimum balance amount in the Financial Center of your online account.  From there, go to the investments page.
       
      If you do invest any of your HSA funds, those funds would be in an “investment” account.  Any funds in an investment account are not FDIC-insured.
       
      Once you open an investment account, a monthly investment fee will be taken out of your HSA cash account.  You can view your account fees in the Financial Center of your online account.  Select your Health Savings Account from the drop down menu.  Click on Fee Schedule on the left side.    
      What are my investment options?                                                                                

      You'll be able to choose from a variety of mutual funds.  You can view these funds in the Financial Center of your online account. Select your Health Savings Account from the drop down menu. Click on the investment link on the left side of the screen to get started.
       
      Note:
      You must have more than required minimum balance in your HSA cash account to invest your funds.  You can invest any amount over this minimum balance.

      *Shares of mutual funds are not insured by the FDIC or any other U.S. Government agency, and are not deposits or obligations of, or guaranteed or endorsed by, BNY Mellon or any bank. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.  All mutual funds are subject to market risk and, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost.  You should consider the fund’s investment objectives and strategies, risks, and expenses before you invest.  This and other information is contained in the fund’s prospectus.  Please use the Investment Information area on this site to access a fund’s prospectus and other fund information.  Please read the fund’s prospectus carefully before you invest.  Carefully weigh the advantages and disadvantages of investing your HSA funds before doing so.  Your ability to replace losses in the investment account may be limited by the annual contribution limits of your HSA. 

      Self-directed investment accounts are the sole responsibility of the account owner.  PayFlex does not offer investment advice.  In selecting and classifying the available mutual funds, neither PayFlex nor BNY Mellon is providing any personalized investment advice in connection with this program.  PayFlex and BNY Mellon are not making a recommendation to individual health savings accountholders ("you") that any of the mutual fund investment options are, or would be a suitable or appropriate investment for you. That decision is yours.

      PayFlex does not provide brokerage or trade processing services; processing services are provided by BNY Mellon. BNY Mellon and its affiliates may receive compensation for providing various services to the funds, including distribution (12b-1) and service fees.  PayFlex and BNY Mellon are separate, unaffiliated companies and are not responsible for one another's services, policies and information.

      Remember, investing in mutual funds will transfer money from your HSA Bank Account to your investments.  You may wish to ensure you retain enough money in your HSA Bank Account to accommodate future medical expenses.
       
      System response and account access times may vary due to a variety of factors, including trading volumes, market conditions, system performance, and other factors.

  • Filing A Claim
    • How do I file an FSA claim?
      After you incur an eligible expense, you can:
      • Submit a claim online. You can upload or fax your documentation to us.
      • Submit a claim using the PayFlex Mobile® app. You can download it for free* from your mobile app store. You’ll use the same username and password that you use for this website.
      • Complete a paper claim form and mail or fax it with your documentation. You can find this form in the Resource Center.
      *Standard text messaging and other rates from your wireless carrier still apply.   

      What do I need to send with my FSA claim?
      It depends on your expense type.

      If your expense went through your medical or dental plan, you’ll need to send an Explanation of Benefits (EOB) from your plan. This is the best form of documentation.

      If your expense didn’t go through your medical or dental plan, you can send an itemized receipt or statement for the expense. It must show the:
      • Date of service or purchase
      • Amount you were required to pay
      • Description of the item or service
      • Name of the merchant or provider
      If the claim is for an over the counter (OTC) drug or medicine, you must also include a written prescription from your doctor.

      For prescriptions, send your detailed receipt. It must include the pharmacy name, patient name, prescription name, date the prescription was filled, and amount you paid.

      For dependent care expenses, the dependent care provider must sign the claim form or provide an itemized receipt. It must include the date(s) of service.

      Note: If you don’t send an EOB, itemized receipt or statement with your claim, we’ll deny it. We can’t accept a cancelled check, credit card receipt, or billing statement that shows “previous balance,” “balance forward,” “estimated,” “filed,” or “pending insurance.”